Topic: Economic Inclusion

27 results

Jun 4, 2018

Refugees in Chad are Making the Desert Bloom

Jun 4, 2018

Refugees in Chad are Making the Desert Bloom “I am able to cover my family’s basic needs and share my produce with my close ones, just like the old times in Sudan.”

Apr 11, 2018

In Ecuador, Starting Over Through Baking

Apr 11, 2018

In Ecuador, Starting Over Through Baking "My biggest dream is to own a bakery where I can give jobs to people who need it," Patricia says.

Jan 22, 2018

HIAS in Ecuador Recognized for “Graduating” Refugees Out of Extreme Poverty

Jan 22, 2018

HIAS in Ecuador Recognized for “Graduating” Refugees Out of Extreme Poverty Long praised for who they were serving, HIAS in Ecuador is now being recognized for how they are serving.

Aug 17, 2017

Permagardening in Chad Boosts Livelihoods For Refugees

Aug 17, 2017

Permagardening in Chad Boosts Livelihoods For Refugees With funds from Jewish World Watch, HIAS Chad has begun implementing a highly innovative and cost-effective initiative to help refugees grow food year-around.

May 18, 2017

New Food Distribution Program Increases Autonomy for Sudanese Refugees in Chad

May 18, 2017

New Food Distribution Program Increases Autonomy for Sudanese Refugees in Chad HIAS Chad is partnering with the World Food Programme and UNHCR to implement a new model for food distribution for Sudanese refugees.

Nov 17, 2016

How One Refugee Family in Ecuador Turned Cheese Into Business Success

Nov 17, 2016

How One Refugee Family in Ecuador Turned Cheese Into Business Success Rather than being intimidated by the economic crisis in her adopted city, María Eugenia took the initiative to start her own business. She makes and sells a traditional cheese called queso amasado. You can now buy her products in three Ecuadorian cities.

Sep 12, 2016

The Coolest Handbags We’ve Ever Seen Were Made by This LGBT Refugee

Sep 12, 2016

The Coolest Handbags We’ve Ever Seen Were Made by This LGBT Refugee Henry started his business with just five hand-sewn tote bags made from pieces of traditional East African fabric. They were an instant hit, and he has been expanding ever since. Over the past 11 months, he has hired 20 LGBT refugees to do piece-work, cutting the fabric he uses to make his bags. By working from home, they stay safe and are still able to earn a living.